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Time for Deep Heat 4! (Oh god.)

This one starts off the same as the aforementioned Warehouse Raves with Starlight’s Numero Uno, although in a slightly neutered radio edit chopping 2 minutes from the end of the track. The Deep Heat compilations started off with a statement to the effect of full 12″ versions on disc on and 7″s on disc 2, but by this time that has been dropped in favour of fitting as many tracks into the space as possible. In this case, there are 32 different tracks across the discs. I’ll skip over the majority of what was side one of the vinyl as it’s fairly ropey, and the only real notable track in my opinion is Kaos – Definition of Love, which is one of Kevin Saunderson’s weaker efforts and move on to the last track on this side.

Kariya – Let Me Love You For Tonight : I seem to remember a slightly filthier version of this, but I can’t seem to find any trace of it so either I’m making it up or it’s an unknown cover version. This track also appears on Warehouse Raves, and again the version here is about 2 minutes shorter. As this is the end of side one the track following is one of Dave Lee’s many alias, Raven Maize – Forever Together. After this there are some interesting if fairly dated tracks from the likes of Royal House – Get Funky, Bang The Party & Maurice – Get Into The Dance.

T.C. – Hello I Love You : A Belgian New Beat cover version of the The Doors track. Thanks very much Belgium. T.C. followed this up with a cover of the Monkees’ Stepping Stone a year or so before The Farm took a stab at the same track.

We get back on track quickly with the wonderful Model 500 – The Chase and then things really start to improve with the pop house stuff that is beginning to take off in the charts, in particular the very lovely Beatmasters & Betty Boo – Hey DJ(I Can’t Dance) and Technotronic featuring a Skinny Model that isn’t actually the singer on this track aka Felly with Pump Up The Jam.

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Skipping over the out of place Ya Bad Chubbs, an odd Hip House track over a disjointed Break For Love which is only really notable for the production by Howie Tee, also responsible for the Real Roxanne, there’s an oddly schizophrenic DJ Fast Eddie mastermix which doesn’t really know if it’s trying to showcase Acid House or Hip House and ends up all over the place in just under 4 minutes.

Next, the Frankie Knuckles/Jamie Principle – Your Love, the main melody of which was later appropriated by John Truelove for the Eren’s Bootleg remix of The Source featuring Candi Staton – You Got The Love. It’s not quite the same melody though, I remember trying to mix the two records togther in the past and being utterly confounded by the cacophonious racket produced. I’ll ignore the next few tracks as they’re a mix of Hip House again, a rip off of Marshall Jefferson’s Truth, the previously mentioned Out of The Ordinary & De La Soul who don’t really need me to rescue them from obscurity and we hit the final side of the disc if I was working from the vinyl issue. First up is Inner City – Ain’t Nobody Better, which is still reasonably good track even thought Kevin Saunderson has produced a boatload of lacklustre house and techno, and we’re quickly back into the Hip House ghetto with Farley Jackmaster Funk’s Hip House track called Think. I don’t think (ho ho) that I need to say anything further about that other than Lyn Collins.

Things start going even worse as the next up is Smokin’ Gang featuring DJ Jack Boy Rapper – Just Rock (Rap House Anthem) trying to define an unwelcome new strain of Hip House called Rap House and I daresay that it’s in this slot so that most folk would turn the record off at this point and just give up, especially as the next track up is Samurai Sam – House The Japanese and I can pretty much hear this one already in my head, but surprisingly enough it doesn’t actually feature the Japanese instrument that I can’t remember the name of that is synthesized at the beginning of Yie Ar Kung Fu just before it declares “Fight!” and then Blue kicks the crap out of you.

I’ve had a few close shaves in a car with not so careful drivers, one being the previously mentioned Bill who didn’t have a Driving License and almost drove straight into a roundabout while we we listening to The Orb as he was somewhat distracted by the music and possibly slightly under the influence. The other one was while driving into Glasgow City Centre and myself and a friend are talking nonsense about Street Fighter 2 or something and while sitting at the red light waiting to turn one of us shouts “Fight!” and our driver takes this as a primal instruction to drive at full speed into the oncoming traffic.

What, procrastinating, me?

Almost at the end, and next is Monie Love – Granpa’s Party, which I don’t remember at the time and it hasn’t exactly aged well. Until fairly recently Monie Love was a Morning show presenter in Philadelphia and is now a an Official MySpace.com DJ, whatever that entails. Next is Total Eclipse, not to be confused with the French Trance folk on Dragonfly record and better forgotten with their contribution and finally we’re at the end and have what is probably the highlights of the disc hidden away here with two Derrick May tracks, R-Tyme – Illusion & Mayday – Sinister, although both are criminally short here.

Deep Heat items on ebay.

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